Mirror Image
the-goddamazon:

winkydean:

sahxyel:

naturalshocks:

figmentdotcom:

afternoonsnoozebutton:

Tip for all my student readers: if you’re too lazy to use a bibliography creator like NoodleBib or RefWorks, let Google generate your bibliography entries for you. All you have to do is google the article/book title in Google Scholar, click “cite” at the bottom of the search result, and copy either the MLA, APA, or Chicago cite into your word document. 

Signal boost because omg how did I not know this in college?



Since registration is starting soon I figure this is ample time to remind the six people who look at my Tumblr that citing your sources is really important in college and that this will be your best friend forever.
If you’re in high school and want to go to college? Learn to source! You’ll be way ahead of the curve and it’s 100% more important than knowing what the hell a predicate nominative is.
I use http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/ to figure out how to cite for my papers, and it’s been quite useful for the three years I’ve been at this!

im crying i have this project due in two days and i didnt do tgis yet ho y fuckl

I wish I’d had all these resources when I was in school.

the-goddamazon:

winkydean:

sahxyel:

naturalshocks:

figmentdotcom:

afternoonsnoozebutton:

Tip for all my student readers: if you’re too lazy to use a bibliography creator like NoodleBib or RefWorks, let Google generate your bibliography entries for you. All you have to do is google the article/book title in Google Scholar, click “cite” at the bottom of the search result, and copy either the MLA, APA, or Chicago cite into your word document. 

Signal boost because omg how did I not know this in college?

Since registration is starting soon I figure this is ample time to remind the six people who look at my Tumblr that citing your sources is really important in college and that this will be your best friend forever.

If you’re in high school and want to go to college? Learn to source! You’ll be way ahead of the curve and it’s 100% more important than knowing what the hell a predicate nominative is.

I use http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/ to figure out how to cite for my papers, and it’s been quite useful for the three years I’ve been at this!

im crying i have this project due in two days and i didnt do tgis yet ho y fuckl

I wish I’d had all these resources when I was in school.

10 TIPS FOR EDITING OTHER PEOPLE’S WRITING

hollywood-legacy:

image

10 Tips for Editing Other People’s Writing

by DailyWritingTips

Here are ten tips for a positive, productive critiquing experience:

1. Tolerate the Task
When you write, you don’t have to be an aficionado or expert to produce an article or a story on a given topic. Editors don’t need these qualifications, either, and they don’t have to be enamored of the writer’s voice or technique. The same goes for someone conducting a critique: Don’t turn down a request for feedback just because you’re not interested in the subject or you don’t like the writing style. Help the writer succeed in reaching the audience they are writing for. (But don’t hesitate to express your opinion if you think the approach is flawed.)

2. Ask for a Clean Copy
The manuscript sample you receive should appear exactly as it would look when it’s ready for submission to a publishing professional. Hard copy should be double spaced and must be free of handwritten annotations or emendations. An electronic document should be professionally formatted and at least mostly devoid of the writer’s notes to self.

3. Mark It Up
If you’re reviewing an electronic copy, activate change tracking and edit it. Insert notes using the comment feature or by entering them in brackets, highlighted in boldface or with colored type or background, so they are easily located and distinguished from the content. If you’re working on hard copy, use a pen or a colored pencil for brief notes, and write or type your detailed queries and comments on a separate sheet of paper or in a computer document.

4. Evaluate the Writing, Not the Writer
Compliments and complaints alike should focus on the product, not the producer. Refer to the sentence or the section, the character or their actions, the narrative flow or the exchange of dialogue rather than to the person who requested your help. Suggest how to improve the article or the story, not the writer.

5. Start — and Stop — with the Positive
Whether you’re responding with general impressions or providing detailed feedback, begin by lauding the strengths of the sample, and reiterate your positive feedback when you summarize your critique. Refer to strengths, not weaknesses, and use positive language: “stronger,” “more interesting,” “a better approach.” Be frank but diplomatic: Even people who can take criticism need to hear that they’re doing something right, and that’s what you should start (and end) with.

6. Craft Your Critiques
Be specific, not vague. Be active, not passive. Point out problems, but suggest solutions. Your goal is to clearly communicate to the writer about how they can more clearly communicate to their readers.

7. Guide, Don’t Carry
The writer will appreciate focused feedback, and you should feel free to model precise changes in structure or tone and detailed revisions of narrative or dialogue, but do so sparingly. Think of your advice as patterns for the writer to use as templates, or you may end up rewriting the piece, and the writer will have learned little or nothing (except never to ask for your help again).

8. Invite Questions
Set up a time to go over your critique after the writer has had a chance to review it. Welcome the writer’s requests for clarification and discussion. If the writer becomes defensive, mention that you have offered your perspective, and that they are free to act on your critique as they see fit.

9. Follow Up
Check in with the writer and see how they’re progressing. No matter how careful you are about being diplomatic, the writer may feel a bit battered, and part of your unwritten contract should include a clause requiring you to keep in touch about the project.

10. Know Your Limits
It’s reasonable for a writer to ask you for a second light look at the piece after they have made changes in response to your comments, or to request that you provide a general impression about a revision based on your in-depth critique. But establish boundaries about how much time and effort you expend on the writer’s work.

For more tips visit: DailyWritingTips.com

daekazu:

Guys,
If you are interested I would like to invite you to my first Little Shop :)

shop-cute:

lunabowtique:

Lemon Dots bow $3.00

You can use the code “pastelcutie” at checkout for 10% off :3

shop-cute:

lunabowtique:

Lemon Dots bow $3.00

You can use the code “pastelcutie” at checkout for 10% off :3

wickedclothes:

Rose Flower Light String

Each of these lights resembles a bright reddish pink rose bud. Dimly lit to provide a calming and comforting atmosphere. Sold on Etsy.

zoomine:

Stradivarius  Violin Pool 

Best Pool Design 2013.”